Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for Sites 19, 22, 30, and 43, Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake, CA.

This task order was originally scoped for the preparation of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) decision documents. However, due to agency requests for additional characterization of the sites including assessment of the emerging contaminant Perfluorinated Chemicals now commonly known as Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS), the task order was modified to change the original scope. Technical Memorandums were prepared to outline the path forward for further investigation of the sites Additionally, Remedial Project Manager (RPM) and Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) meeting support were added to the task order.

This task was originally scoped to prepare a Proposed Plan (PP) and an Improved Record of Decision (iROD) for all four sites. Installation Site Program (IRP) Site 43 was an active fire fighter training area. IRP Sites 19, 22, and 30 included two range disposal areas and a municipal landfill.

However, during the early stages of the project it was determined that the sites were inadequately characterized and the Navy, US EPA, and the State of California identified an emerging contaminant Perfluorinated Chemicals, now commonly known as Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS). The task order was modified to change the original scope. Technical Memorandums were prepared to outline the path forward for further investigation of the sites Additionally, Remedial Project Manager (RPM) and Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) meeting support were added to the task order.

IRP Site 19 – Baker Range Waste Trenches

IRP Site 19 was an open disposal site from 1944 to 1983, with wastes that included range target debris, scrap metal, wood, concrete, and electronic parts that were reportedly placed in a trench measuring approximately 450 feet long by 25 feet wide by 10 feet deep. The site reportedly received approximately 3,000 cubic yards of solid waste and was subsequently covered with soil. Previous groundwater sample results provided no indication of groundwater contamination from the waste disposal at Site 19. No human health chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) were identified for soil or groundwater. A geophysical study was conducted as part of the preparation of the Feasibility Study to better delineate the trench.

IRP Site 22 – Pilot Plant Road Landfill

IRP Site 22 is an approximately 250-acre landfill that received the majority of household wastes generated by on base housing and the NAWS Public Works Department, and small amounts of industrial materials, from 1944 to 1965. Based on its disposal history, IRP Site 22 was classified as a municipal landfill and may have been covered with clay soil from the Mirror Lake Playa, located along the northern side of the site. No chemicals of concern (COCs) or COPCs were identified for soil or groundwater at IRP Site 22.

IRP Site 30 – C-1 Range West Disposal Area

IRP Site 30 includes ordnance waste trenches thought to have received inert and live ordnance waste from 1950 to 1979. The site contains an area of noticeable disturbance, which is surrounded by signs indicating burial of ordnance, and surrounding areas of surface debris that show no signs of trenching of waste burial. The waste on the ground surface at IRP Site 30 is assumed to be the same age as the ordnance landfill waste. No dioxins, explosives, polychlorinated biphenyls, perchlorate, semi-volatile organic compounds, or petroleum hydrocarbons were detected in either surface soil or groundwater samples. No human health COPCs were identified for soil or groundwater. A geophysical study was conducted to better delineate the trenches.

IRP Site 43 – Fire Division Carrier Deck Fire Facility

IRP Site 43 consists of a large concrete pad (the Mini-Deck) that was used as a platform on which to simulate a fire on an aircraft carrier deck during firefighting test and research operations. The Mini-Deck was used intermittently for firefighting tests from at least 1965. During the test operations, a fire set on the waterflooded concrete surface was fanned by wind generated by a turboprop airplane or a bank of large fans onsite. Fuels used to generate the fire were reported to include JP-4, JP-5, and avgas. Trainees were required to put out the fire using aqueous film forming foam. Naphthalene was identified as a COC for soil. Naphthalene and Benzene were identified as COCs for groundwater.